Who we are


MISSION


The mission of the Peter-McGill Community Council is to bring together and promote collaboration between the district’s residents, shopkeepers, workers and  students, and the public and community organizations that serve them. The Table aims to encourage a sense of belonging to the neighbourhood and an active involvement in the life of the community by creating a place where stakeholders can express their concerns, collectively determine priorities for action and be  empowered to improve the quality of life in the neighbourhood.

OBJECTIVES


  • To create a space (literal or figurative) where the population (residents, merchants, workers, students in the district) may express concerns, make known their points of view and engage in collective actions to improve the quality of life in the neighbourhood;
  • To develop ways of informing and communicating with the district’s residents, merchants, workers and students, and the public and community organizations that serve them;
  • To bring together residents, merchants, workers and students with the public and community organizations that serve them to collectively identify community needs, prioritize  actions and carry them out.

OUR HISTORY


Before 2002 there were a few sectoral round tables in the western part of downtown. They included the Regroupement des services aux aînés-centre-ville, Forum jeunesse, the Table des centres de la petite enfance, the Comité de direction jeunesse, a table for groups working with women in the CLSC Métro area and an itinerant round table. These were discussion or information forums consisting solely of community organizations and public institutions. With the exception of the itinerant round table, their area of concern was the CLSC Métro area (which included the Westmount borough, western downtown and the McGill ghetto) and not a geographically determined area.

These round tables focussed on certain subjects, and it was apparent that they were limited in their ability to act more globally on topics concerning the quality of life downtown. The idea of developing a neighbourhood round table grew in the minds of several people for some time. Forum jeunesse entertained the notion with a view to carrying out certain large-scale projects that exceeded its mandate and for which it did not have the resources to get off the ground.

The Montreal Summit, which was held in May and June 2002, was an occasion to bring together the community organizations in the Peter McGill district, with all sectors of intervention taken into account, to inform them of how the consultative event would unfold and to collectively define the district’s priorities and needs. Once these needs were identified, and due to the fact that very few of the organizations in the district were invited to speak during the summit, the organizations present were prompted to band together in order to put forward their point of view, coordinate their efforts and take action regarding the needs that had been identified.

A working committee was then formed to start up a neighbourhood round table. The Peter McGill Community Council round table was incorporated in December 2002 and held its founding meeting in June 2003.

Since then, the Table has conducted various activities and allowed community actors to speak with one voice on matters related to urban planning, social housing, social inclusion, urban safety, abatement of traffic, green spaces, cleanliness and the place of families.

Recent Posts

The promise of a public primary school in Peter-McGill: Residents and organisations concerned by mixed messages

August 17, 2017 Montreal – Mayor Denis Coderre announced on Monday, as part of his action plan for the Downtown Strategy, that a public primary school will be built on the former Montreal Children’s Hospital site. While the inclusion of a school on the site was one of several recommendations from the Office de consultation publique de Montréal (OCPM), the Mayor’s announcement appears to be premature.

The President of the Commission scolaire de Montréal (CSDM), Catherine Harel-Bourdon, confirmed with Radio-Canada on Tuesday that Quebec government regulation does not allow school boards to rent private property for public schools. This regulation would make it impossible for the CSDM to rent space from Devimco, the developers and owners of the site. The CSDM is currently in conversations with Education Minister Sébastien Proulx to try to change these regulations, but nothing has been confirmed thus far. There are currently 330 children residing in Peter-McGill without access to a public primary school in their own neighbourhood.

This announcement is not the only precarious part of Mayor Coderre’s overly ambitious plan. The City relies too heavily on revenue from private developments and property taxes to fund its activities, inevitably leading to increased densification of the downtown area. As such, the action plan includes expanding the downtown population by 50,000 people before 2030. This disconcerting proposal encourages an influx of people in the downtown core without first addressing longstanding issues affecting the 34,000 residents of Peter-McGill. Residents of the neighbourhood have been deprived of ample green and recreational spaces, outdoor sports facilities, social housing, as well as the aforementioned public primary school for many years.

The Peter-McGill Community Council urges Mayor Denis Coderre to focus first on the issues affecting current residents of downtown before attempting to increase the population further. The Council also implores Minister Sébastien Proulx to work with the CDSM to change current education regulations so that this much needed school can be built.

ABOUT THE PETER-MCGILL COMMUNITY COUNCIL:
Peter-McGill Community Council is a non-profit organisation that brings together people who reside, study or work in the Peter-McGill area, as well as community organisations and institutions that serve them. Its mission is to improve the quality of life in the Peter-McGill district by supporting the development of neighborhood life and promoting citizen participation.
The Community Council has more than 200 members, including 125 residents of the district and 75 organisations and institutions that serve a diversity of residents in the area.

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For further information:
Corey Gulkin, CIP Communications Officer
Peter-McGill Community Council
(514) 755-2305
communicationPIC@petermcgill.org

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